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Team Believe raises money for area charities through running

Running a 10-mile race is a tremendous challenge. But if you’ve got the right motivation, those 10 miles can feel like nothing at all. That’s the idea behind Team Believe, a grassroots organization that brings together local runners to help the Central New York community. The group, which got its start in 2009, asks participants to help raise money for local children’s charities while training for the Dunn Tire Mountain Goat Run in Syracuse in May.

Kicking off the New Year right

It is that time of year again — time to “set New Year’s resolutions,” “get in shape,” “work on the waist line,” “go on a diet,” “start fresh,” whatever you want to call it, most people feel the need to reevaluate their habits in January after all the holiday hoopla is over. Usually diet and exercise habits rank high on the list of “needs improvement.” On Jan. 1 (or maybe Jan. 2), the “hard core dieters” and the “gung-ho gym members” begin their quest. They sweat, grunt, groan, “give up carbs” and step on the scale every day. A month later, most of them find themselves exhausted, sore, injured, hungry, deprived, miserable and frustrated (maybe even a few other adjectives). They may or may not be in better shape or weigh less. If you plan on trying this approach, please reconsider. If you want long lasting success and really want to feel better emotionally and physically, please try this approach…

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Clay teen wants to become MMA champ

Don’t mess with Bailey Sherbourne. She’s not your average 13-year-old girl. Bailey, of Clay, has been practicing martial arts for 10 years already. She earned her black belt after three years of karate, moved onto Brazilian jiu-jitsu, for which she has seven years under her orange-yellow belt, and began wrestling this past year with the Cicero-North Syracuse High School modified wrestling team as one of two girls out of more than 40 teammates.

Kids with cancer: Part V: Survivors continue to deal with side effects from treatment

As it turned out, Erin Hannagan was one of the lucky ones. Hannagan was 16 when she was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s disease May 25, 1993. But she would beat the disease. “I had been coughing for quite some time and had been diagnosed with multiple ‘colds,’” Hannagan recalled. “It finally got so bad that my mom took me to an urgent care center where a chest X-ray was done that revealed a large mediastinal [cavity containing the heart, esophagus, trachea, thymus and aorta] mass.”

Kids with cancer: Part IV: Community organizations, individuals provide relief to young patients

Maureen Humphrey lost her child to cancer, but not in the traditional sense. Humphrey was pregnant in June of 2001 when she learned that she had clear cell adenocarcinoma, a rare and aggressive cervical cancer that necessitated a radical hysterectomy as well as the removal of 28 lymph nodes. “No one ever expects that cancer or illness will happen to them, and we certainly felt the same way,” said Susan Bertrand of Baldwinsville, Humphrey’s older sister. “Maureen's cancer diagnosis was a shock, but worse than the diagnosis was the grief she felt knowing she was going to lose her unborn child and never again have the chance to conceive or carry her own child again.”

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Kids with cancer: Part III: You can help raise money to find a cure

Chris Arnold and Ellen Yeomans thought a bone marrow transplant would cure their daughter’s leukemia. Paige Yeomans Arnold was diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in June of 1993. The cancer is typically found in adults, not children, who are more likely to get acute myelogenous lymphoma (AML) or acute lymphocytic lymphoma (ALL). At first, she was treated with an experimental drug called Interferon, which put her into a brief remission. But a few months later, the cancer returned, leaving the family with just one choice: a bone marrow transplant.

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Kids with cancer: Part I: Families facing devastating diagnosis need support

At first, Melissa Lowell thought her son Nate was just tired. “This time last year [he started getting sick],” Melissa said. “It started off, he just had a cough. It was the end of the school year and he seemed fatigued. It was nothing out of the ordinary. I just figured it was because school was over. He was leaving a teacher he loved. He gets emotional with change, as any kid does.” But the cough didn’t go away. Nate, then 10, was complaining that he couldn’t breathe, couldn’t swallow. After a couple of weeks, Melissa and her husband Jimmy took him to an urgent care facility near their home in Herkimer County. He was diagnosed with asthma and given prednisone and an inhaler, which helped at first, but soon proved ineffective. A visit to Nate’s pediatrician July 3, 2012, suggested pneumonia.

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CNY SPD Parent-Connections offers support for parents of children with sensory processing disorders

When Caryn Daher’s son, Jon, was little, he was into everything — even more than the average toddler. “He was… constantly bumping and crashing into things and people and seeking-jumping type activities,” said Daher, a Cicero resident. “He had difficulty in regulating and responding to movement activities appropriately. It went far beyond a ‘busy’ toddler.” In addition, Jon struggled with a variety of sounds, often withdrawing or avoiding certain situations because of the noise level. He had higher-than-average sensitivities to food, temperature and touch. In addition, his speech was delayed. It was that delay that led to help for his other issues. Through his speech therapist, Jon was diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder.

Aspen has a ‘Change of Heart’

Aspen Athletic Clubs has partnered with Conde Nast to raise awareness on heart disease through an experimental program called "Change of Heart."

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Tobacco-Free Onondaga County aims to make residents healthier

As we enter the New Year, many of us are pledging to get healthier — to lose weight, exercise more, eat more fruits and vegetables. But possibly the healthiest resolution, and one of the most enduring, is to quit smoking. But given that tobacco kills more people every year than alcohol, car accidents, cocaine, heroin, homicide, suicide, fire and AIDS combined, wouldn’t it be better never to start?

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Caz artist raises $225 for stray animals

Student drew pictures, donated funds to Wanderers’ Rest

Last year, a fourth grader at Burton Street Elementary School spent her extracurricular time raising money in hopes of donating to Wanderers’ Rest Humane Association in Canastota.

Plans for Ninth Annual Chilly Chili heat up

This year’s race will be held on Sunday, Jan. 6. The race will begin at 1 p.m. in front of the Cazenovia Middle School at 31 Emory Ave.

CBSA warms up for new season

Caz Baseball and Softball Association readies for 2013

The Cazenovia Baseball and Softball Association held its annual meeting on Dec. 16 at the Lincklaen House in Cazenovia.

Paw prints: Lumps and bumps

Community Columnist

Finding a lump on your dog is quite common, especially as they age.

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‘Freezin’ for a reason’

Budnar, Goldacker to participate in Sunday’s CNY Polar Plunge

This Sunday, Dec. 2, Special Olympics New York athletes and Cazenovia residents, Diane Budnar and Ryan Goldacker, will help lead the Sixth Annual Central New York Polar Plunge at Oneida Shores in Brewerton, with members of the Law Enforcement Torch Run.

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