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The ultimate act of love

Placing a child for adoption is heartbreaking, but sometimes the best choice for the child

Carrie Howard was thrilled when she found out she was pregnant. “I always wanted to be a mom,” Howard said. “I was living with my boyfriend and his family. I was 20 years old and was very excited when I found out.” But things quickly went downhill. “My boyfriend didn't want to be a father,” Howard said. “I ended up having to move out and back in with family. My family was supportive, but they were unwilling to have a newborn in the home. I found myself at a crossroads where I had no job, no home, no license or car, not really anything to offer a child.” So Howard, a Liverpool native, decided to place her unborn child for adoption.

OCC child care faces cuts

Community college students may soon have a harder time finding child care while they go to school. In his 2014-15 executive budget proposal, Gov. Andrew Cuomo proposed cutting $653,000 from the state’s operating grant to the State University of New York’s child care centers. The cut would come in addition to a reduction in the federal Child Care Block Grant, which subsidizes care for children of needy student-parents. While the New York State Senate restored Cuomo’s cut in their budget proposal, advocates say the cuts faced by SUNY centers in the last several years are still devastating and need to be restored. And it’s community colleges that will likely see the most damaging consequences.

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LHS junior conducting toy drive for Rescue Mission

Amanda Hebblethwaite was literally woken from a sound sleep one night by a drive to help others. “I woke up in the middle of the night one night and thought about how awful it would be not to be able to have your parents be able to give you gifts for Christmas,” Hebblethwaite said. “The next morning I talked to my mom about it, and she suggested I start a donation drive for some place like the Rescue Mission.” Hebblethwaite ended doing just that. The Liverpool High School junior is conducting a toy drive for the Rescue Mission, collecting new and gently used toys for children in need.

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Buddy Walk is one of many supports offered by DSA of CNY

The DSA of CNY offers a number of activities for families of those with Down syndrome, but its biggest event — and the only one it offers that’s open to the entire community — is the Buddy Walk, which celebrates its 15th year this fall. “At our Buddy Walk, we do not focus on the therapies, doctor appointments, etc., that is a part of their daily life. We celebrate the joy of having them in our lives and family,” Bottego said. “Most of the committee members have worked on the Buddy Walk from the beginning. We have volunteers who come back year after year because it such an uplifting event.” The Buddy Walk will take place on Sunday, Sept. 29 at Long Branch Park in Liverpool. Registration starts at 9:30 a.m.; walkers who have pre-registered can pick up their preordered shirts. Walk-in registration is also available. T-shirts are available to purchase. Children’s games are open from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and only shut down while the walk is in progress. Attendees can purchase raffle tickets The walk starts at 10:30 a.m. The walkers follow the path out of the Longbranch Park area into the Willow Bay section of Onondaga Lake Park.

Kids with cancer: Part V: Survivors continue to deal with side effects from treatment

As it turned out, Erin Hannagan was one of the lucky ones. Hannagan was 16 when she was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s disease May 25, 1993. But she would beat the disease. “I had been coughing for quite some time and had been diagnosed with multiple ‘colds,’” Hannagan recalled. “It finally got so bad that my mom took me to an urgent care center where a chest X-ray was done that revealed a large mediastinal [cavity containing the heart, esophagus, trachea, thymus and aorta] mass.”

Kids with cancer: Part IV: Community organizations, individuals provide relief to young patients

Maureen Humphrey lost her child to cancer, but not in the traditional sense. Humphrey was pregnant in June of 2001 when she learned that she had clear cell adenocarcinoma, a rare and aggressive cervical cancer that necessitated a radical hysterectomy as well as the removal of 28 lymph nodes. “No one ever expects that cancer or illness will happen to them, and we certainly felt the same way,” said Susan Bertrand of Baldwinsville, Humphrey’s older sister. “Maureen's cancer diagnosis was a shock, but worse than the diagnosis was the grief she felt knowing she was going to lose her unborn child and never again have the chance to conceive or carry her own child again.”

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Kids with cancer: Part III: You can help raise money to find a cure

Chris Arnold and Ellen Yeomans thought a bone marrow transplant would cure their daughter’s leukemia. Paige Yeomans Arnold was diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in June of 1993. The cancer is typically found in adults, not children, who are more likely to get acute myelogenous lymphoma (AML) or acute lymphocytic lymphoma (ALL). At first, she was treated with an experimental drug called Interferon, which put her into a brief remission. But a few months later, the cancer returned, leaving the family with just one choice: a bone marrow transplant.

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Cicero youths to host lemonade stand to raise money for pediatric cancer research

On any given street corner all summer long, you’re likely to find a gaggle of kids hawking lemonade and cookies. But some of those would-be salesmen and –women are selling for a good cause. This Friday, June 28, and Saturday, June 29, Madison King, 9, Owen Greco, 9, and Nadia Greco, 7, will set up a lemonade stand at 8434 Rollercoaster Drive, Cicero, and donate the proceeds to Alex’s Lemonade Stand, a charity that funds pediatric cancer research.

Raising awareness about autism

It is estimated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that autism has risen to one in every 88 births in the United States. In order to raise awareness about the programs and services available to families affected by autism, the New York State Senate has commemorated April 2013 as Autism Awareness Month.

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CNY SPD Parent-Connections offers support for parents of children with sensory processing disorders

When Caryn Daher’s son, Jon, was little, he was into everything — even more than the average toddler. “He was… constantly bumping and crashing into things and people and seeking-jumping type activities,” said Daher, a Cicero resident. “He had difficulty in regulating and responding to movement activities appropriately. It went far beyond a ‘busy’ toddler.” In addition, Jon struggled with a variety of sounds, often withdrawing or avoiding certain situations because of the noise level. He had higher-than-average sensitivities to food, temperature and touch. In addition, his speech was delayed. It was that delay that led to help for his other issues. Through his speech therapist, Jon was diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder.

A message to the little ones lost on Dec. 14

Dear Charlotte, Daniel, Olivia, Josephine, Ana, Dylan, Madeline, Jesse, Catherine, Chase, James, Grace, Emilie, Jack, Noah, Caroline, Jessica, Avielle, Benjamin and Allison, You were taken too soon, that is true. It is also true that you have experienced an unimaginable, horrifying end to your promising lives. I am so truly sad that this world will not experience you as teenagers, young adults, mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, grandfathers and grandmothers. You didn’t get your chance to fulfill the promise in your shining eyes and wide grins depicted in the photos lovingly treasured and shared by your families.

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‘Going Native’ at the Cazenovia Public Library

“Going Native,” one of the popular Zoo To You programs at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo, will be presented at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 2 in the Cazenovia Public Library Community Room.

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Playscape takes shape at CCH

The Windy Willow Playscape at the Cazenovia Children’s House is becoming a reality, as construction for the new playscape began last month.

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CCP to launch new Afterschool Enrichment Program this fall

A new kind of afterschool experience is the vision of Cazenovia Community Preschool’s enrichment program for children in grades K-4, which will begin fall 2012. The program will focus on art, music, foreign language and will also include tutoring.

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ADA celebrates 22nd anniversary this week

On July 26, 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed landmark legislation that would change the lives of the disabled nationwide. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, transportation, public accommodation, communications, and governmental activities. The ADA also establishes requirements for telecommunications relay services.

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